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Acronyms used in the website

SABCL - Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library

CWSA - Complete Works of Sri Aurobindo

CWM - Collected Works of The Mother

Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Summary of Book-9.htm
SUMMARY OF BOOK NINE THE BOOK OF ETERNAL NIGHT CANTO I TOWARDS THE BLACK VOID So Savitri was "left alone in the huge wood", "her husband's corps on her forsaken breast". She did not weep, nor did she rise to face the dreadful god of Death. She felt "as if her mind had died with Satyavan". She elapsed closely the lifeless form of Satyavan. Then suddenly a change came over her—as it happens sometimes to the human soul—the veil was torn and then "the thinker is no more, only the spirit sees" and "all is known". "Then a calm Power seated above our brows is seen". It is "immobile", "it moves Nature, looks on life". "Then all this living mortal clay" "Is
Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Appendix - 3.htm
APPENDIX III SAVITRI VOL. II "Then Spring, an ardent lover, leaped through leaves". —Book IV, Canto I. Compare: Tagore's song to the "Spring". "Hetâ sapane Shyam dekhâdile boneri kinâre". "To see her was a summons to adore, To be near her drew a high communion's force." —Book IV, Canto 2. Compare: Four aspects of the Mother—"Mother" Ch. VI. "This transient earthly being if he wills Can fit his acts to a transcendent scheme". —Book IV, Canto .3 Compare: "A magic leverage suddenly is caught, That moves the veiled Ineffable's timeless will: A prayer, a master act, a king idea Can link man's strength to a transcendent
Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Summary of Book-2-Part-2.htm
CANTO VI THE KINGDOMS AND GODHEADS OF THE GREATER LIFE From the region of the lower vital plane where Aswapathy found the denial of the highest possibilities of man he came up to the kingdoms of the higher vital where he found at least "a dubious hope". There was in this plane of consciousness a possibility of self-finding, a sureness of form, adventure of the mind and choice of the human heart, "And a touch of sure delight in unsure things". In this higher vital world there was always the zest: of achievement, of trial and dream but none of these things ever fulfilled itself. For "To achieve would have destroyed that magic Space". They were worlds of mar
Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Summary of Book-2-Part-3.htm
CANTO X THE KINGDOMS AND GODHEADS OF THE LITTLE MIND Aswapathy had to overpass the higher vital world as he had to reach the very Highest "In whom the world arid self grow true and one". The human journey upward cannot cease till that is reached. So long as the human being remains satisfied within the limits of its vital desires and their satisfaction, so long as "This creature hugs his limits to feel safe", till then he cannot aspire to realise the spiritual Self, "It could not house the wideness of a soul Which needed all infinity for its home." Aswapathy saw before him a road stretching to timelessness, disappearing into a sky, lighted wit
Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Introduction.htm
I INTRODUCTION I IN approaching Sāvitrī as a poem we must take note of the — possible difficulty likely to be encountered by foreigners who are not accustomed to certain ideas of Indian culture. It is natural that having a different background of culture they would find it difficult to enter into the spirit of a poem which has been called "a legend and a symbol".¹ In fact, since Dr. J. H. Cousins' book New Ways in English Literature and even before it, there had already begun to collect a considerable body of literature, including poetry, written in English by Indians. For some time it was called "Indo-English literature" but since the popularity and the great trium
Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Trends in Modern English Poetryeng-poetry.htm
III TRENDS IN MODERN ENGLISH POETRY So far as poetical creation is concerned, the present is a period of transition, that is to say, there are many widely separate attempts, some fine and powerful beginnings but no large consummation, no representative work, no dominating figure. But it is a period full of hundreds of influences, many-motived, and therefore naturally rich in interesting and fruitful experiments. So far as the output of the modem poetry is concerned the new age is not yet. It is with Sāvitrī that the new age may be said to have arrived. Among the precursors of this new age may be counted Whitman, Carpenter, Yeats, A. E. Mere
Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Summary of Book-4.htm
SUMMARY OF BOOK FOUR CANTO ONE THE BIRTH AND CHILDHOOD OF THE FLAME The frenzied earth followed the course of her movement "around a Light she must not dare to touch". In this swing of the inconscient earth Life was born and a finite world of thought and action also whirled "across the immobile trance of the Infinite". In the vast silence that ran with her "she communed with the mystic heart in space", "amid the ambiguous stillness of the stars". The earth "moved towards some undisclosed event." "Day after day sped by like coloured spokes" and "the seasons drew in linked significant dance". The alterations of the seasons were like the rhythmic pageant of d
Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Summary of Book-3-Part-1.htm
SUMMARY OF BOOK THREE THE BOOK OF THE DIVINE MOTHER CANTO I THE PURSUIT OF THE UNKNOWABLE THE whole experience of life in the world as it is today can give — something. But, it is too little and "cannot fill the spirit's sacred thirst." Something seems to be missing which is badly wanted to make life perfect. In the absence of that something all other things acquired by man lose their significance. To Aswapathy came that experience— "The labour to know seemed a vain strife of Mind, All knowledge ended in the Unknowable: The effort to rule seemed a vain pride of Will". Thus, finding the pursuits of life insipid, he
Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Summary of Book-6.htm
SUMMARY OF BOOK SIX CANTO I THE WORD OF FATE Narad, the sage, from Paradise came chanting through the air "bordering the mortal's plane". He came attracted by the golden summar-earth that lay like a bowl "tilted upon a table of the Gods" He came from happy paths of the immortals "to a world of toil and quest and grief and hope", of death and life. From Mind he passed to Matter. He passed through a sea of ether and then through "primal air", from there he went through the "creative fire" and saw its triple power "to build and form". "He beheld the cosmic Being at his task" and "the eternal labour of the Gods". Then a change of mood came over Narad:
Resource name: /E-Library/Disciples/Purani, A. B./English/Sri Aurobindos Savitri -An Approach And A Study/Summary of Book-11 and 12.htm
SUMMARY OF BOOK ELEVEN THE BOOK OF EVERLASTING DAY CANTO ONE THE ETERNAL DAY: THE SOUL'S CHOICE AND SUPREME CONSUMMATION NOW God's everlasting day surrounded Savitri: She lived in the finite fronts of Infinity—they were ever new to an everlasting sight. Delights, grandeur, powers, scenes, forms—all came from the eternal Source. Night was impossible there. It was "a march of universal power in Time" harbouring a cosmic rapture in endless figuring of the spirit. Of all that was there "eternity was the substance and the source". All occult planes were seen and found active: "seven immortal earths", ''homes of the blest", pastures of eter